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Stories of the House: The Steinway Piano

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This morning, some wonderful guests were enjoying playing our Steinway piano, which they were surprised to find at a B&B and in such good shape. Their fresh eyes helped us slow down to enjoy the music and delve into another one of our Stories of the House.

Steinway Serial Number

Steinway Serial Number

Our Steinway Grand Piano #180984 was built in New York between 1916-1917. We can tell this because Steinway does an excellent job of helping people identify their pianos through their Serial Number Database.

The original serial number was probably on the cast iron plate between the tuning pins above the keyboard, however we can no longer read the number there. Luckily, the number is also stamped underneath the piano, towards the pedals.

While we don’t have a history of how the piano spent its early years, we know that it was purchased in California in the early 1960’s by the Coulson family when their daughter, your Innkeeper Florence March, needed a piano to continue her piano lessons at home. Her incredible piano teacher Donald Anthony helped the family find the right piano, which he insisted would be a Steinway.

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The Steinway remained at Florence’s childhood home for many years, eventually finding a new home at her brother Eric’s house once his two boys were ready to learn piano. (Florence’s daughter Connie, also one of your innkeepers, threw far too many piano-lesson-related temper tantrums and quickly gave up on piano lessons, much to her adult-self’s chagrin!) Eric’s boys studied piano for several years, until they decided that they preferred violin. Once they switched instruments, Florence jumped at the opportunity to welcome the Steinway back into her life here in Gettysburg.

Three-thousand miles later, the piano arrived safely at Battlefield Bed & Breakfast. Upon its first tuning, the technician discovered massive amounts of legos, crayons, and other childhood objects hidden inside the piano, which dramatically affected the sound. Once cleared of its extra “gifts,” the music poured out freely and beautifully.

Now, a technician visits at least once per year to make sure the 100+ year old beauty is still playing to its full potential. This past year’s visit, the technician discovered over 20 poker chips stuffed into the keys by some young guests that continued the family tradition of finding nooks and crannies to hide treasures. While we enjoyed a nice laugh at the Steinway’s history as a secret spot for toys, we were so happy when it was freed up to return to its true sound.

Come play with us! We love it when guests take a turn tickling the ivories. The piano has also serenades brides walking down the aisle and accompanied countless songs as special events and parties.

If you would like to schedule a house concert, please consider this an open invitation! Call Florence at 717-334-8804 to schedule some music magic!

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Recipe: Barbara's Favorite Snickerdoodles

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Snickerdoodles

Simply delicious!

Enjoy this guest favorite at home!

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

  • 2 tsp. cream of tartar

  • 1 tsp. baking soda

  • 1/2 tsp salt

  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg

  • 2 sticks butter, softened

  • 1 1/4 cup sugar

  • 2 eggs

  • Cinnamon sugar (1/4 cup sugar and 1 Tbsp cinnamon and 1/8 tsp nutmeg)


Instructions

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  • Pre-heat oven to 375 F.

  • Wisk together dry ingredients.


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  • In separate bowl or electric mixer, cream together butter and sugar until fluffy (up to 5 minutes).

  • Beat in eggs one at a time.

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  • Mix in dry ingredients until just blended.

  • Chill dough for about an hour. Note: we tend to skip this step.

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  • Roll dough into 1 1/2 inch balls.

  • Roll balls in cinnamon sugar and space on baking sheet about 3 inches apart.

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  • Bake for about 12-15 minutes, until edges are lightly browned.

  • Cool on rack.

  • Enjoy!

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Gettysburg: Carriage Rides on the Battlefield

Connect with nineteenth century life by taking a carriage ride on the Gettysburg Battlefield.

Feel the sway of the carriage and imagine how different the pace of life was when fast travel was limited by the speed of a horse or the path of a train track.

Smell the leather of the harness and the musk of the horses. Nineteenth Century life was rich with odors.

Share seats with friends and family as you pass the time enjoying passing nature and untampered fresh air. The Nineteenth Century had time for friends and family and a closeness with nature.

Tour the Battlefield by horse-drawn carriage

Tour the Battlefield by horse-drawn carriage

Two strong draft horses from the Victorian Carriage Company pull the wagon through the Gettysburg Battlefield

Two strong draft horses from the Victorian Carriage Company pull the wagon through the Gettysburg Battlefield

View Little Round Top from a horse-drawn carriage

View Little Round Top from a horse-drawn carriage

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Gettysburg: Nineteenth Century Thinkers

The Battle of Gettysburg happened in the midst of a Civil War .

To understand the context of the battle, read not only about the strategy and tactics of the Civil War, but also about the thinking of the time that propelled the country into war over slavery.

Some of the notable thinkers of the time who opposed slavery included President Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman, Frederick Douglas, Sojourner Truth, Ralph Waldo Emerson, William Lloyd Garrison, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Mark Twain.

Harriet Beecher Stowe House wallpaper with illustrations from Uncle Tom’s Cabin and poster for Uncle Tom’ Cabin play. Stowe’s writing stirred antislavery compassion before and during the Civil War.

Harriet Beecher Stowe House wallpaper with illustrations from Uncle Tom’s Cabin and poster for Uncle Tom’ Cabin play. Stowe’s writing stirred antislavery compassion before and during the Civil War.

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Recipe: Nutty Peach Crisp (Vegan, Gluten-Free, Delicious)

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Recipe: Nutty Peach Crisp (Vegan, Gluten-Free, Delicious)

Peach season is magical in Adams County, Pennsylvania. Enjoy the bounty with this fresh, fruity, guilt-free delight!

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Nutty Peach Crisp with Oats, Almonds, and Pecans

(Vegan & Gluten-Free)

Nutty Peach Crisp with Oats, Almonds, and Pecans

(Vegan & Gluten-Free)

Peach Filling

  • 8-10 fresh peaches, parboiled, peeled, and sliced (about 9-10 cups)

  • 1 tsp fresh lemon juice

  • 4 Tbsp maple syrup

  • ½ tsp cinnamon

  • 1/8 tsp nutmeg

  • 2 tsp arrowroot (or cornstarch)


Crisp Topping

  • 1 cup almond flour

  • 1 cup rolled oats

  • 1 cup pecans, roughly chopped

  • 2 Tbsp maple syrup (or more, to taste)

  • ½ tsp salt

  • 4 Tbsp coconut oil


Directions

• Preheat oven to 350 F.

• In large bowl, combine all peach filling ingredients and stir to coat peaches.

• Pour peach mixture into 9x13 baking dish and place it on a baking sheet to catch drips if fruit boils over. Cook peaches uncovered for 10 minutes.

• While peaches bake, whisk the dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Add coconut oil and stir to combine until oil is evenly distributed. Taste to see if it’s sweet enough. If not, add 1 Tbsp at a time of maple syrup until it’s perfect.

• Pull fruit out of oven and sprinkle topping until it is evenly distributed.

• Bake until fruit is bubbling and crisp is golden brown, usually about 30-40 minutes.

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Gettysburg: July 3 The Anniversary of the South Cavalry Battlefield Conflict at Battlefield Bed & Breakfast

Today, we are commemorating the Gettysburg Civil War Cavalry Battle on our farm here at Battlefield Bed & Breakfast. The fighting on our property occurred during and slightly after Pickett’s Charge, also known as Longstreet’s Assault about two miles from the inn on the Emmitsburg Road.

Because the fighting here lasted longer than the infantry charge called Pickett’s charge, our property may have had the last gunshot of the Battle of Gettysburg, 156 years ago on this day, July 3.

If you are coming to Gettysburg for the Gettysburg Battle Reenactment, here is a map to the events and a schedule of the major battle reenactments.

Gettysburg Reenactment 2019

Battle Times

Friday, July 5th - 11:00 a.m.

Friday, July 5th - 4:00 p.m.

Friday, July 5th - 4:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 6th - 11:00 a.m.

Saturday, July 6th - 4:00 p.m.

Sunday, July 7th - 10:30 a.m.

Sunday, July 7th - 2:30

Gettysburg Reenactment Map 2019 on Pumping Station Road

Gettysburg Reenactment Map 2019 on Pumping Station Road

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Innkeeper Life: Fireflies in Gettysburg

If you want to feel the real magic of Gettysburg, come at the end of June or the beginning of July for firefly season. As the sun sets, the seas of rich grass start to sparkle, first a few twinkles, and then as those twinkles are answered by distant firefly friends, the twinkles start to rise into the air and climb into the trees. As darkness falls, the Battlefield and for us, the grounds of Battlefield Bed & Breakfast, come alive as the trees turn into lighted fantasies of magic lights.

Our 30 acres are preserved as a wildlife habitat. We haven’t used any kinds of toxic sprays on our land for 25 years. The fireflies are a wonderful and wild expression of the best of Mother Nature. Come enjoy!

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Innkeeper Life: Dressing for Gettysburg in June

Expect almost anything but cold weather! June has beautiful days for hiking with blue sky and refreshing breezes. Some days are starting to get into the 80’s with humidity to match.

Sudden thunderstorms that might drop the temperature a wind-whipped 20 degrees for an hour or two. Then the sun may suddenly reappear.

You should bring a light wrap, but you may not need it. Prepare for rain, but expect a lot of good weather.

The evenings are starting to be warm. By June, the fireflies are out. You may enjoy time by the firepit or by the deck fireplace. You still may want a light wrap some evenings.

For shoes, you want something that can tolerate water and a muddy path so you can hike the Battlefield.

Bring bug spray for a few mosquitos and quite a few ticks.

Relax on our patio or deck with a cool drink and enjoy spring in Gettysburg.

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Recipe: Cloud Eggs

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Experience the magic of Battlefield B&B’s newest savory entrée:,

Cloud Eggs!

Ingredients (per person)

  • 2 eggs

  • ¼ cup sharp cheddar, grated

  • 1 teaspoon chives, chopped

  • Olive oil, for baking sheet

  • Salt & pepper, to taste

Yolks waiting for clouds.

Yolks waiting for clouds.

Directions

Shape fluffy whites into clouds.

Shape fluffy whites into clouds.

  • Preheat oven to 475° F.

  • Grease baking sheet with a thin layer of oil.

  • Separate eggs, keeping yolks intact.

  • Beat egg whites to stiff peaks.

  • Fold in cheddar and chives.

  • Drop whites into cloud shapes on baking sheet.

  • Use the back of a spoon to create an indentation in the top of the cloud.

After whites have set, pull them out and drop yolks into indentations.

After whites have set, pull them out and drop yolks into indentations.

  • Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

  • Bake eggs for 3 minutes.

  • Pull out eggs and place one yolk in the indentation atop each cloud.

  • Bake for another 4-5 minutes, until cheese is browned and the top of the yolk is soft set.

Eggs are finished when whites are toasted and yolks are soft-set.

Eggs are finished when whites are toasted and yolks are soft-set.

  • Bake for another 4-5 minutes, until cheese is browned and the top of the yolk is soft set.

  • Serve immediately because they fall quickly.

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Gettysburg: Victorian Carriage Company Battlefield Tours

There are many ways to enjoy the Battlefield. One of the most memorable is a guided carriage ride through the Third Day’s Battlefield with the Victorian Carriage Company.

A carriage can hold you and your entire extended family. What a wonderful way to create a memory!

A carriage can hold you and your entire extended family. What a wonderful way to create a memory!

The farms and barns along the old Emmitsburg Road are some of the sites you will visit on your carriage ride.

The farms and barns along the old Emmitsburg Road are some of the sites you will visit on your carriage ride.

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Innkeeper Life: Composting at Battlefield Bed & Breakfast

Here are two easy ways to compost your food scraps and soft garden trimmings and weeds.

Why compost?

Your plants need organic matter in the soil. When you make compost and add it to your garden soil, you are doing three wonderful things for your plants.

  1. You are feeding your plants nutrients.

  2. Your are adding material that will help the soil stay moist and loose so the roots can thrive.

  3. You are feeding the microbes and worms in the soil that are necessary for a healthy garden ecosystem.

Easy composting for your garden.

You can compost in place and plant your vegetables right on top of your compost pile.

  1. Make a container to hold the compost. Your container can be a ring of chicken wire or a cardboard box. Your container should breathe.

  2. Layer your soft garden trimmings including grass and pruning bits, fall leaves, and weeds that have not yet gone to seed with some soil or potting mix and sprinkle with nitrogen fertilizer. Pack down the layers so they don’t dry out.

  3. Put a layer of good garden soil or potting mix on top.

  4. Sprinkle from time to time if there isn’t enough rain to keep it damp.

Your pile will be ready to plant with vegetables in a few weeks. Don’t worry if it isn’t completely composted. It will continue to break down as your plants grow. If you use a cardboard box, the box will also compost.

Easy kitchen composting

Just put an old blender by your sink. Put all the food scraps directly into the blender including your coffee grounds and salad and fruit trimmings. You can even put some animal products in your compost mix. Then cover your kitchen scraps with water. Blend into a slurry and go pour it in your garden around your flowers, shrubs or anywhere where you are preparing a new garden. It is not recommended to pour the slurry directly on the vegetable garden where you are growing food to eat.

Your compost slurry will breakdown very quickly and add nutrients and texture to your garden soil.

You will also help your garbage service because you won’t have smelly rotting food in your garbage can. Everyone wins!

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Gettysburg: Cyclorama Evening With The Painting

Several times a year, the Gettysburg National Military Park allows visitors to get an inside visit with the spectacular Cyclorama mural of the Battle of Gettysburg.

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Gettysburg Cyclorama

These special events called An Evening With the Painting allow you experience the beautiful 377 foot circular mural with guide Sue Boardman. You will learn about the story of the mural and then go down underneath to see the complex structure of the mural display.

Only forty visitors are allowed to attend each event. To order tickets, visit GettysburgFoundation.org or call the Reservations Department at 877-874-2478

The program will be offered in 2019 on:

  • Saturday, Feb. 23, 5 - 7 pm

  • Saturday, March 23, 5 - 7 pm

  • Saturday, June 15, 6 - 8 pm

  • Saturday, July 20, 6 - 8 pm

  • Saturday, Aug. 17, 6 - 8 pm

  • Saturday, Oct. 12, 6 - 8 pm

  • Friday, Nov. 22, 5 - 7 pm

  • Saturday, Nov. 23, 3:45 - 5:45 pm

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Innkeeper Life: How early do you need to book your room?

We give our in-house guests the first chance to rebook the same time next year. This means that we do not take reservations more than a year in advance.

If you have a special room that you want on a specific date, please call us as soon as you make your plans. Otherwise, it only takes one person to book the room and it is no longer available.

Does that mean that you shouldn’t even try if you want to travel at the last minute? No! Please give us a call and see if we have any rooms. Just be prepared to be flexible about what room you stay in.

We require a two night minimum for Saturday night stays in our busy season (April - November.) We will waive the two night minimum if you call within a week of your stay and the room is still available.

We hope this helps you plan your visit. Hope to see you soon!

Houghtelin's Hideaway Guest Room at Battlefield Bed & Breakfast

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Gettysburg: Celebrate the Holidays in Gettysburg

Holiday cheer surrounds you in Gettysburg.

Are you looking for a place to feel the holiday spirit? Come back to Gettysburg!

The Gettysburg Christmas Festival: The First Weekend In December

The Christmas Festival inspired spirited celebrating and shopping throughout the historic streets and shoppes. The festival date is in the past but the the spirit is still here. Come and discover the holidays in Gettysburg, PA!

Gettysburg Lincoln Square dressed for the holidays with Christmas tree and lights

Gettysburg Lincoln Square dressed for the holidays with Christmas tree and lights

Roaring 20’s at A&A’s Village Treasures

Roaring 20’s at A&A’s Village Treasures

Gettysburg Christmas Haus on Baltimore Street

Gettysburg Christmas Haus on Baltimore Street

Speakeasy fundraiser for Ruth’s Harvest at Gettysburg’s Spirited Ladies

Speakeasy fundraiser for Ruth’s Harvest at Gettysburg’s Spirited Ladies

Gettysburg’s Battlefield Bed & Breakfast is filled with holiday spirit. The breakfast room decor has Santa hats for our guests.

Gettysburg’s Battlefield Bed & Breakfast is filled with holiday spirit. The breakfast room decor has Santa hats for our guests.

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Gettysburg: Camp Letterman

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Gettysburg: Camp Letterman

Camp Letterman

Gettysburg's Civil War Tent Hospital

Did you know your innkeeper Debbie March is a direct descendant of the Wolf family that owned the farm where Camp Letterman Hospital was located after the Battle of Gettysburg? When the Federal Government set up a temporary hospital for the wounded from the battle, they selected the location of the Wolf farm on the York Pike. The farm had running water, shade trees, and most important, good access to major roads and the railroad. The tent hospital was supplied with surgeons, nurses, cooks, quartermaster, and supply clerk. The hospital was named after Dr. Jonathan Letterman who was the Medical Director for the Army of the Potomac. 

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